23 Apr 2014

3 Growth Hacks You Likely Haven’t Come Across

Here are some unique growth hacks I noticed while browsing around the web.

(Growth hacks are just the application of creativity -often in the form of programming, hence hacking- to marketing. They’re abundant – increasing every day as more CRO happens and more educated marketers teach others at an ever faster pace thanks to the web.)


1. Related content at the end of a Youtube video, but before the “time” is up.

You can have whatever content you want in your video provided that it abides by Youtube’s Terms and Conditions… so why not offer related content at the end?

That’s exactly what this video does, extending it’s duration by about 15 seconds during which it shows links for related videos. Even smarter, the video does so in a way that emulates Youtube’s own related-video-suggestion user interface. This makes it easy for browsers to understand.

Before the video ends, this video publisher offers engaging image links promoting its other content. This gives them the best of both worlds - they can use Youtube for all it offers, yet keep their traffic for their own videos rather than what Youtube thinks a visitor is likely to click on next.

Before the video ends, this video publisher offers engaging image links promoting its other content. This gives them the best of both worlds – they can use Youtube for all it offers, yet keep their traffic for their own videos rather than what Youtube thinks a visitor is likely to click on next.


2. Custom social proof integrated into bottom-of-the-funnel ads

You might say social proof is no hack, as everyone knows about its importance – and you’re right. What makes this a hack is the clever implementation of social proof not just on the landing page, but at the ad level.

Now, Facebook has long sold ads that have Like data associated with them, and likewise the +1 boxes on Google Display Network ads. So you might say, “I still don’t see the hack, here, Gab!”

Here’s what’s new: the social proof is now focused on bottom of the funnel. In the two cases below, one is a searcher, and the other is a direct response ad – not just about buying likes or +1s.

In the screenshot below, Google shows a quotation from the BBC that likely raises the CTR on the search ad… and increases the advertiser’s conversion rate in the process.

Google AdWords has integrated social proof into the ads it runs, likely increasing CTR and conversion rate for the advertiser.

Google AdWords has integrated social proof into the ads it runs, likely increasing CTR and conversion rate for the advertiser.

You can take social-proof-in-an-ad a step further though. Why limit yourself to what the news have to say? How about telling people that others who are similar to them have bought the product – in the ad itself! That’s what Amazon have done here:

Affiliate ads for Amazon (or perhaps a direct media buy) integrate customized social proof. Here, a publisher displays an ad with the mention that other readers of the site bought the product.

Affiliate ads for Amazon (or perhaps a direct media buy) integrate customized social proof. Here, a publisher displays an ad with the mention that other readers of the site bought the product.


3. Using backlink research tools to build a swipe file.

Those of you who have written direct response copy know that it’s a lot easier to write when you have others to steal ideas get inspiration from. You could, of course, do that solely with Googling around.

But what if you looked at the backlinks for forms.aweber.com? You would have lots of examples of what people are doing… often doing wrong… but regardless, a lot that you could learn from.